Tutorial: Add a Sleeve Lining to the Robson Trench Coat

When I made my sister’s Robson Trench Coat, I decided to line the sleeves.  I did this so the coat would slide on and off a little easier.  It worked really well, and I recommend it for this pattern.
MJB Trench Coat

A couple notes on this tutorial.  First, this may not technically be the “right” way to line a sleeve. It’s simply what made sense to me, and it worked. Second, I apologize for the quality of the pictures. I was snapping these with my phone as I sewing late into the night. Finally, I’m going to refer to the sleeve lining as simply “lining” and the fashion fabric sleeve as “sleeve.”

Supplies: 

    • Approximately 3/4 – 1 yard of lining fabric.  I used Bemberg  rayon, which is my favorite lining material.  But anything slippery should work.
    • You may also want to use wider bias tape to finish the armhole seam.  I picked up a package of the “Wide Single Fold” stuff.

Steps:

1. Cut the lining fabric, using the pattern pieces for the sleeve.  BUT – this is important – cut the lining 1″ shorter than the main fabric.

2. Sew the sleeve, as directed by steps 21 and 22 in the pattern, EXCEPT don’t finish the seams or the sleeve hem with bias tape. DO do the topstitching and attach the sleeve tab.  STOP before hemming the cuff.

3. Sew the lining, and finish the seams. (I just pinked mine.)  Do not apply any bias tape, and topstitching is not needed.

4. Insert the sleeve into the lining, with right sides touching.Untitled

5. Line up the bottom edges of the lining and the sleeve, matching the seam lines, and pin.
sleeve lining

6. Sew the lining to the sleeve, using a 5/8″ seam allowance.
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7. Pull the lining down over the sleeve, and then shove the lining back up inside in the sleeve. The wrong sides of the fabrics should now be touching, and the lining should be inside the sleeve.
sleeve lining
sleeve lining
sleeve lining

8. Turn the whole sleeve and lining unit inside out. Turn up the cuff your desired amount and press, making sure to smooth the lining back. (You should be pressing the seam allowance of the seam you just sewed up towards the sleeve cap.) Pin.
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9. Sew the cuff. Do not catch the lining in this seam.
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10. Set in the sleeve, ignoring the lining for now. I pushed my my lining down into my sleeve to keep it out of the way.

sleeve lining

Tip – baste your sleeves first, it makes it easier to set them in.

11. Pull the lining up, and line up the edge of the lining with the edge of the sleeve. (You will have to ease in the lining, just like the sleeve, to get everything to fit.)sleeve lining

12. Baste (or pin) the lining to the seam allowance of the sleeve, matching seam lines and notches. I highly recommend basting!
sleeve lining

13. Finish the armhole with bias tape. Make sure the bias tape fully encases the edge of the lining and the sleeve seam allowance.

NOTE: I started out with the bias tape I had used elsewhere on the coat.  But it was too narrow to easily fold over the bulky seam allowance. (This is a bulky seam because the front and back flaps are also sewn into the armhole.) I switched to the ‘Wide Single Fold’ bias instead, and it worked better for me.
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Once the bias tape is sewn in, remove the basting if it shows, and now the lining is fully attached!
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14. If you turn the sleeve inside out and smooth the lining down the sleeve, there will be a little excess lining that can be pressed into into jump hem.
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MJB Trench Coat
And that’s it!   🙂

Details: Butterick 5032 (Mad Men Challenge Dress)

Here’s the inside story of my Mad Men Challenge dress.
Mad Men Challenge Dress

The main fabric is a cotton/poly sateen.  I like it because it doesn’t wrinkle very badly.  But pressing was a pain!  To help minimize shine and the darts/seam allowances leaving imprints on the front, I used a silk organza press cloth and card stock.
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If you don’t have a silk organza press cloth – get one, seriously!  It’s so great to be able to to see through the cloth when pressing.  (I bought a yard of silk organza, and cut myself a square from that.)

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Pressing the belt for my Robson Coat…. More on that soon!

I learned the card stock trick in tailoring class.  If you sandwich strips of paper between your seam allowance/darts and main fabric, it prevents them from marking through on the front.  It’s fiddly to do at first, but gets easier with practice.
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Anyway, enough about pressing . . . back to the dress . . .
One of my favorite details on this dress are the front pleats.  I was worried my fabric would be too heavy and stiff for them.  But a trip through the washer and dryer fixed that.  The heat from the dryer made the poly all soft and drapey.
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The dress is fully lined with gray Bemberg lining.  I also finished the edges of my facings with bias strips I made from the lining.
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And check out edges of the facings and the waist seam  – they match up almost perfectly!  This is probably the best I’ve done yet!  Ya, I know, I probably get too excited about these things that no one sees.  🙂
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Also added my ‘label’ and under-stitched the facings by hand.
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I did another handpicked lapped zip.  (If you haven’t tried this yet, go watch Sunni’s free zipper tutorial on Craftsy.  It’s great!  She shows how to do a lapped zip on the machine, but you can easily adapt her method to do it by hand.  Instead of top stitching down the outside with your machine – hand sew that part with pick stitches.)
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I’ve struggled to find the best way to finish the top of the zipper and the facing.   I messed with this for a long time, and while it could be less bulky, I think it hides the tab pretty well.
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The pattern has a slit in the back.  Normally I would have changed it to a kick pleat, but decided to give the slit a try.  It turned out okay, but I like kick pleats better.

Mad Men Challenge Dress Back

And check out my mitered corners on the inside of the slits.
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On the hem, I tried something new.  The sateen puckered really bad when I tried to hem it by catching just a thread of fabric on the back side.  So I fused some weft interfacing along the hem line, and caught that instead of the fabric.  It solved the puckering problem.  Hopefully the fusing will hold up in the wash.
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So there you have it, the insides of my Butterick 5032.  I like this pattern, it was easy to fit and easy to sew, making it a double-winner for me!  🙂

Completed: Rose Truffle Dress

I was in the mood for a quick, instant gratification kind of sewing project.  So I turned to my tried and true Truffle pattern.  Since I’ve made the this pattern so many times, I thought I’d knock out in a few days.  But sometimes things don’t turn out like you plan.

Anyway, without further adieu – here’s my Rose Truffle:
Rose Truffle

On this version I raised the neckline, moved the zipper to the side, lengthened the skirt, and of course went ruffle-less.  I also fully lined the dress, and drafted neck facings.

Rose Truffle
I moved the zip to the side so I wouldn’t have to match the fabric on a center back seam.  I also just like how side zips look.
Rose Truffle
I handpicked the zipper again, which has become my go-to method.  This time I added light interfacing to the seam allowance before installing the zip and I think it gives the lap more structure, and it sits more smoothly.
Rose Dress Details
Rose Dress Details
As for the lining, I finished the edge of the facings with a hong kong finish, in a contrasting color.  This is my favorite detail of this dress.
Rose Dress Details
As usual, the Truffle pattern didn’t let me down, and I’m really happy with this version!
Rose Truffle
More details:

Rose Dress Details

Front

Rose Dress Details

Back

Rose Dress Details

Rose Dress Details

Lining. (Those are sun spots btw, and not a problem with the fabric.)

Rose Dress Details

Rose Dress Details

And in case you’re thinking I only sew Truffles, I swear, I’m working on a different dress pattern right now!  🙂

Completed: Colette Peony Dress

It’s finished!  It’s finished!  My Peony is finished!  Now if only the sun will come out!
Peony

I actually finished this last week, but between gloomy weather and the fact it’s dark when I get home, photos have been a challenge.

Peony

Me and my sewing buddy, Millicent. Hmm…she’s suspiciously taller than me!

I started this dress back during Sew Colette, before the group went on hiatus for the holidays.  I had a difficult time fitting the bodice. Honestly, I almost gave up on this dress. But I’m so glad I didn’t. The fit turned out pretty good, I think.
Peony

My biggest trouble was with the sleeves. I thought I worked out at the muslin stage, but when I sewed them into my final dress, they just weren’t working for me.  They looked okay, but felt tight and restricting.  So I ripped them out, and went sleeveless instead. This is better for wearing with a cardigan anyways, which is what I always wear at work.

The fabric is a stretch cotton sateen that I found at a local shop.  Depending on how you look at it, you may see dots or stars.  I really like it, and I think the extra stretch helped the bodice fit.
Peony Details
Peony Details

Here’s the insides:
Peony Details
Peony Details

I lined the skirt with red Bemberg rayon.  I also made some bias strips out of the lining fabric, which I used as a hem tape.  This fabric was fiddly to turn into bias tape, but I think it’s a lot nicer than the stiff store-bought stuff.
Peony Details

I tried a few new techniques on this dress.  First, I used bias tape as a facing for the armholes. After I nixed the sleeves, I didn’t feel like drafting an armhole facing piece. The bias strips worked really well. (I also made this bias tape, using the same contrast fabric from the neck facing.)
Peony Details

Second, I did a Hong Kong finish on the edge of my neck facings.  I used some of the red lining bias strips for this.  I really like this finish, and plan to use it again.
Peony Details

Third, I put in a centered hand-picked zipper.  This worked just as nicely as the lapped versions I’ve been doing recently.  Actually, it might have even been easier!
Peony Details

The sun peeked out for just a minute this afternoon, so I tried to capitalize on it for a quick outdoor shot.

Peony

This dress took me a long time to finish, and I’m happy it’s done. Now I can move on to my next project! Here’s a small sample of the fabric I cut out last night:
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Completed: Holiday Truffle

With the upcoming holiday party season, I decided a holiday dress was in order.  Here’s my completed holiday version of the truffle dress.  This is officially Truffle #4 for me.  I might be a truffle addict!

For this make, I altered the pattern even further. I raised the neckline, added a waistband, and made double darts on the skirt front.

Holiday Truffle

Holiday Truffle

I made this with some inexpensive brocade. My ideas was to make this quickly and not put in too much effort. But then the perfectionist in me couldn’t stop from lining it, and doing my usual amounts of hand sewing. I like the end result because it feels like a party dress, but now I wish I would have used better quality fabric. It’s already snagged in a few places, and I honestly don’t think this dress will hold up for the long run.  So sad.

Holiday Truffle

Holiday Truffle

Dart detail

The insides:

Holiday Truffle
Holiday Truffle

Holiday Truffle

Hmm, my embroidered tag almost disappeared into the print.

I did another hand-picked lapped zipper too. It’s official, I think I may do all my zippers this way forever.
Holiday Truffle

Stay tuned, I’ll be posting more about how I made my modifications soon!  And, yep, I think it’s time to admit that I’m definitely a Truffle addict.  🙂

Holiday Truffle